EDP Sciences Journals List
Issue J. Phys. IV France
Volume 03, Number C9, Décembre 1993
Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on High Temperature Corrosion and Protection of Materials
Actes du 3ème Colloque International sur la Corrosion et la Protection des Matériaux à Haute Température
Page(s) C9-971 - C9-978
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jp4:19939100

Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on High Temperature Corrosion and Protection of Materials
Actes du 3ème Colloque International sur la Corrosion et la Protection des Matériaux à Haute Température

J. Phys. IV France 03 (1993) C9-971-C9-978

DOI: 10.1051/jp4:19939100

Sliding Wear of TiN coated 321 stainless steel in CO2 at 300 and 500°C

F.H. Stott1 and D.R.G. Mitchell2

1  Corrosion and Protection Centre, UMIST, Manchester, U.K.
2  School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Australia.


Abstract
Advanced carbon dioxide-cooled nuclear reactor environments can be tribologically hostile, with steel components sliding in contact at high temperatures. Although wear-protective oxides can reduce damage in the steady-state conditions, severe wear can occur in the early stages, particularly at temperatures of 300 to 500°C, where oxidation rates may be low. In this paper, results are presented of the effects of thin titanium nitride coatings in protecting 321 stainless steel against sliding damage in carbon dioxide at 300 and 500°C. At 500°C, the coating prevented the severe wear which occured in the early stages for uncoated specimens and there was a smooth transition from protection by the ceramic coating to protection by the oxide on the substrate, ensuring maintenance of low wear rates and steady friction profiles. At 300°C, breakdown of the coating was followed by metal-metal contact and a sharp increase in friction and wear rate. This was consistent with the behaviour of uncoated steel where wear-protective oxides were unable to develop under the present conditions at 300°C. However, pre-oxidation of both coated and uncoated specimens for long periods at higher temperatures improved considerably the wear performance at thus temperature, due to the increased availability of oxide to develop the wear-protective surfaces.



© EDP Sciences 1993