Numéro
Le Journal de Physique IV
Volume 03, Numéro C5, Octobre 1993
Third International Conference on Optics of Excitons in Confined
Page(s) C5-143 - C5-146
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jp4:1993525
Third International Conference on Optics of Excitons in Confined

Le Journal de Physique IV 03 (1993) C5-143-C5-146

DOI: 10.1051/jp4:1993525

Observation of higher confined exciton states in serpentine superlattices by linear polarized excitation spectroscopy

H. WEMAN1, C.E. PRYOR2, M.S. MILLER3 and J.L. MERZ3

1  Department of Physics and Measurement Technology, IFM-FOA, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden
2  Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, U.S.A.
3  Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, U.S.A.


Abstract
(Al,Ga)As serpentine superlattice (SSL) quantum-wire arrays with a paraboliccrescent cross section have been grown on vicinal GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The quantum wires have dimensions on the order of 5 nm and 1D confined valence band states have been reported previously. Here we report on subsequent SSL samples having photoluminescence (PL) linewidths of 5 meV and displaying well-resolved excitation spectra. The data were obtained at 1.4 K and include linearly-polarized PL and PL excitation spectra (PLE) taken normal to the vicinal (100) surface. These data were fitted with effective-mass calculations that include the SSL geometry, valence band mixing, and imperfect lateral composition modulation. In linear polarized PLE (polarized parallel and perpendicular to the quantum wires), we have been able to resolve a SSL-induced heavy-light hole splitting of the ground state exciton. The observed heavy-light hole splitting is of the order of 5 meV with an electron-heavy hole subband separation of 15-20 meV. We extract a lateral composition modulation between the barrier and the wire to be 15 % from the observed heavy-light hole splitting corresponding to a lateral potential-energy difference in the conduction band of about 120 meV.



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