Numéro
J. Phys. IV France
Volume 02, Numéro C2, Septembre 1991
Proceedings of the Eighth European Conference on Chemical Vapour Deposition / Actes de la 8ème Confèrence Européenne sur les Dépôts Chimiques en Phase Gazeuse
Page(s) C2-405 - C2-412
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jp4:1991249
Proceedings of the Eighth European Conference on Chemical Vapour Deposition / Actes de la 8ème Confèrence Européenne sur les Dépôts Chimiques en Phase Gazeuse

J. Phys. IV France 02 (1991) C2-405-C2-412

DOI: 10.1051/jp4:1991249

INFLUENCE OF EXCITATION FREQUENCY ON ORIENTED (10(-1)0) GROWTH OF ALUMINIUM NITRIDE THIN FILMS BY PECVD

N. AZEMA1, J. DURAND1, R. BERJOAN2, J.L. BALLADORE3 and L. COT1

1  Laboratoire de Physicochimie des Matériaux, URA 1312 du CNRS, 8 rue de l'École Normale, F-34053 Montpellier cedex 1, France
2  Institut de Science et de Génie des Matériaux et Procédés, BP 5, Odeillo, F-66120 Font Romeu, France
3  CEMES-LOE CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne-Marvig, F-31055 Toulouse, France


Abstract
The Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition process assisted by reactive plasma, leads to AlN coatings with oriented (10[MATH]0) structure. The Aluminium nitride was synthesized on a wide range of substrates (Silicon (100) or (111) wafers, graphite, polycrystalline Silicon Carbide and glass plates) from trimethylaluminium and ammonia at 330°C. The a-axis orientation of AlN coatings, which does not depend on the substrate, changes with the excitation frequency. Material crystallinity and elementary composition were examined mainly by X-ray diffraction and Auger Electron Spectroscopy respectively. Crystalline AlN was obtained for low frequency fields (35-110-440 kHz) with mean crystallite sizes of 200-600 Å, whereas amorphous films were obtained using a 13.56 MHz frequency. The AES analysis has revealed compositions similar to AlN with a small percentage of Carbon (2-4 %) and no Oxygen (for all experimental conditions). To corroborate these results, Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Infra-Red absorption spectroscopy are used.



© EDP Sciences 1991