Numéro
J. Phys. IV France
Volume 02, Numéro C2, Septembre 1991
Proceedings of the Eighth European Conference on Chemical Vapour Deposition / Actes de la 8ème Confèrence Européenne sur les Dépôts Chimiques en Phase Gazeuse
Page(s) C2-343 - C2-356
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jp4:1991242
Proceedings of the Eighth European Conference on Chemical Vapour Deposition / Actes de la 8ème Confèrence Européenne sur les Dépôts Chimiques en Phase Gazeuse

J. Phys. IV France 02 (1991) C2-343-C2-356

DOI: 10.1051/jp4:1991242

PLASMAS : SOURCES OF EXCITED, DISSOCIATED AND IONIZED SPECIES. CONSEQUENCES FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION (CVD) AND FOR SURFACE TREATMENT

A. GICQUEL1 and Y. CATHERINE2

1  Laboratoire d'Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Hautes Pressions, Université Paris-Nord, CNRS-UP 1311, avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, F-93430 Villetaneuse, France
2  Laboratoire des Plasmas et des Couches Minces, Institut des Matériaux de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière, F-44087 Nantes Cedex, France


Abstract
The use of the Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition techniques have increased during the last decades. PECVD attractiveness, basically due to the lowering of the substrate temperatures, has enlarged its uses because it allows an action of ions or excited species. However, the choice of the reactors is not always easy. After presenting the main domains of applications of the PECVD techniques, we describe the principal plasma reactors together with their specific characteristics. The basic phenomena involved in the flowing plasma and the attempts for their modelling are then presented. Finally, the consequences for the deposition rate and the efficiency of the surface treatment are discussed.



© EDP Sciences 1991