EDP Sciences Journals List
Issue J. Phys. IV France
Volume 03, Number C9, Décembre 1993
Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on High Temperature Corrosion and Protection of Materials
Actes du 3ème Colloque International sur la Corrosion et la Protection des Matériaux à Haute Température
Page(s) C9-697 - C9-706
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jp4:1993973

Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on High Temperature Corrosion and Protection of Materials
Actes du 3ème Colloque International sur la Corrosion et la Protection des Matériaux à Haute Température

J. Phys. IV France 03 (1993) C9-697-C9-706

DOI: 10.1051/jp4:1993973

Corrosion in coal gasification atmospheres

Roger A. Perkins

Consultant, 1142 Lincoln Dr., Mtn.View, CA, 94040, U.S.A.


Abstract
Corrosion of metallic materials by coal gasification atmospheres has been the subject of extensive study for over 20 years. While many alloys were found to be resistant to attack by high moisture content gases representative of fluidized bed gasifiers at temperatures up to 900 °C, good resistance could not be sustained for more than a few thousand hours as a result of changes in the structure and composition of oxide scales. A shift to use of entrained slagging gasifiers by the electric power industry during the past 12 years has largely eliminated the need for metallic materials to operate above 600 °C. However, the moisture content of the gas has been reduced greatly and nearly all materials form non-protective sulfide/oxide scales and can have high rates of surface recession, even at low temperatures. The challenge for the 90's is to develop a basic understanding of factors controlling the rate of surface recession in such atmospheres and to develop new alloys that will have adequate resistance to attack. Research should be directed to the effect of alloy and gas composition on corrosion mechanisms and kinetics in low moisture gas representative of entrained slagging gasification at high temperature reacting with metal surfaces at temperatures of 300-600 °C.



© EDP Sciences 1993