EDP Sciences Journals List
Issue J. Phys. IV France
Volume 03, Number C9, Décembre 1993
Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on High Temperature Corrosion and Protection of Materials
Actes du 3ème Colloque International sur la Corrosion et la Protection des Matériaux à Haute Température
Page(s) C9-687 - C9-694
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jp4:1993972

Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on High Temperature Corrosion and Protection of Materials
Actes du 3ème Colloque International sur la Corrosion et la Protection des Matériaux à Haute Température

J. Phys. IV France 03 (1993) C9-687-C9-694

DOI: 10.1051/jp4:1993972

The significance of velocity exponents in identifying erosion-corrosion mechanisms

M.M. Stack, F.H. Stott and G.C. Wood

University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, Corrosion and Protection Centre, P.O. Box 88, Sackville St., Manchester, M60 1QD, Great Britain


Abstract
The modes of erosion-corrosion are diverse and may vary from being "erosion-dominated", where erosion of metal is the dominant process, to "corrosion-dominated", where erosion of oxide scale is the dominant process. The intermediate situation in which erosion of transient oxide is the predominant process is termed "erosion-corrosion-dominated" and describes the regime in which continual formation and removal of oxide occurs down to the scale/metal interface. This paper considers some of the recent erosion-corrosion data and evaluates the velocity exponents. The critical factors which affect velocity exponents in these environments are identified, and some general principles and provisos are outlined when attempting to use such a technique to identify the mechanism of erosion-corrosion on the material surface. It is shown that the velocity exponents derived for "erosion-dominated" conditions are similar to those evaluated for "ductile" erosion processes. However, for "corrosion-dominated" conditions the exponents are significantly lower than those derived for "brittle" erosion processes at room temperature. For "erosion-corrosion-dominated" conditions the situation is more complex with velocity exponents being strongly dependent on temperature, alloy composition and relationship between velocity and particle flux. It is concluded that velocity exponents may be used only in very specific cases to identify erosion-corrosion mechanisms as the relationship between erosion-corrosion rate and velocity is complex and is a function of a wide range of parameters.



© EDP Sciences 1993